To Be Or Not To Be… Part 2

Imagine no limitations; decide what's right and desirable before you decide what's possible. Brian TracyTo be or not to be.

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Those six words question the balance between the state of being versus the state of not being. Do you want to live a life of balance? Are you truly alive, or are you settling for a day-to-day existence in which you are alive, but not living your passion? Hamlet wanted to avenge his father’s murder. He wanted to set his world right, which his father’s violent end had thrown off kilter. Yet he didn’t go charging off in cartoon-hero fashion. Hamlet had very human generic for sale concerns about “the rub”: the difficulties, the objections, and the obstacles. It wasn’t until he faced his doubts and moved ahead anyway that he was able to create change. As a speaker

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who wishes to have an impact on your audience, you are no different. You must overcome your own doubts, demons and nagging fears. “What if the audience doesn’t like what I have to say? What if I forget my talk? What if…?” Like Hamlet, you have a choice. You can choose…to use your voice to make a difference dosage vs in the world. You can choose…to influence and empower others with inspiration custom care and imagination to make changes in their lives. You can choose…to

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be a confident, articulate, compassionate speaker who chooses “To Be!” If you are ready to learn how to give voice to your passions and gifts contact fda Elizabeth Bachman at ElizabethBachman.com

Spring Panic

BlossomsGuest blog post by Cara Corodoni: Spring, spring, spring is almost sprung, especially if you’re in California where we skipped winter this year. Spring, when the seemingly dead reveals itself as only dormant; when then earth once more begins her veil dance, showing a little green here and there, oh la la! A flash of color a snippet of birdsong. Rising desire. Spring, a lovely time to surrender to the cycle of abundance, to be comforted by the repetition beyond our control. Spring is also a time of new beginnings, in many ways the true beginning of the year. And new beginnings mean change, and where there is change or the longing for change, there is resistance. Ah, resistance, fear, anxiety, wish for control, for knowing how it will all turn out. Spring panic: The energy we feel at reconnecting to the possibility, at seeing the earth burst forth and both being called and fearful ourselves. Within resistance, there are assumptions and limiting beliefs – often a space in which we let our brain’s negativity bias call the shots. Our desires can scare us, activating a digging-the-heels-in, I-don’t-need-anything-to-change reaction even when we really want everything to change. There are numerous ways to grapple with resistance and its feelings of fear, anxiety, and panic; thank goodness ’cause we need them all! Here I invite you on a Spring mindfulness approach to moving through resistance. Continue reading

Celebrating Women’s History Month

We are celebrating Women’s History Month in March by recognizing some of the famous women speakers and their famous speeches. We hope you will join us in honoring the Women throughout History who have stood up and spoken up to improve the lives of others. Women’s History Month is dedicated to bring more awareness of the impact that women have had and continue to have on shaping our lives and world as it is today.

Oprah Winfrey

Oprah Winfrey

These famous women speakers have stood up in the face of opposition and even death threats to be heard so that others might gain their rights and freedom. They are an inspiration to all of us in their courage and passion for bringing about change. Their words will be remembered and have a lasting impact long after they are gone.

Sharing my passion for speaking by helping presenters give voice to their passions and bring their gifts to the world is my way of making a difference, just as these famous women speakers did.

“There really is nothing more important to me than striving to be a good human being.” Oprah Winfrey

Over the centuries there have been many famous women speakers, some of whom have had an impact – locally or globally. The ones below have impacted me personally.

Some of my Favorite Famous Women Speakers and Speeches are:

  • Maya Angelou – On The Pulse Of Morning
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton

    Elizabeth Cady Stanton

    Elizabeth Cady Stanton – First Anniversary of the American Equal Rights Association

  • Hillary Clinton – Women’s Rights Are Human Rights
  • Shirley Chisolm – Equal Rights For Women
  • Sojourner Truth – Ain’t I A Woman?
  • Eleanor Roosevelt – What Libraries Mean To The Nation
  • Oprah Winfrey – 54th Annual EMMY Awards
Maya Angelo

Maya Angelou

Who would you add to this list?

I encourage you to take some time to read these speeches and learn about these and other famous women at Speeches by Famous Women – click HERE

Please comment and share below about your favorite famous women speakers and speeches.

If you are ready to learn how to give voice to to order your passions and gifts contact Elizabeth Bachman at ElizabethBachman.com

The Speakers “10 Minutes to Spotlight”

On your mark, get set…

timeforactionIf you are like me, and are working the room where you will be speaking up until the last minute, be sure to take a private moment before you go onstage. It is a critical step to take the time to center yourself and prepare for your presentation. Find a quiet room, if one isn’t available, go to the bathroom. Take a deep breath and let all your distractions and nerves flow out of you as you exhale. If you, like me, need to review your notes and remind yourself about your key points, this is the time to do so. If I get rattled onstage, it is almost always because I went out without taking the time to ground myself. To make sure you get your moment alone, set your phone alarm to vibrate about 10 minutes before the event starts and keep the phone in your pocket where you can feel it vibrate. If it’s not possible to carry your phone, the other option is to have an assistant or friend watching the clock for you. Ask her (or him) to tap you 10 minutes before the start time, to ensure you have time to wrap up a conversation and find that quiet spot. Be sure to pick out that quiet spot right after you arrive at the event. Want to know how you can relieve your speaking anxiety and get grounded? Here are some tips that I use and I share with the speakers I train:

8 Tips for Releasing Speaking Anxiety:

  • Deep breathRemember to Breathe: Anxiety tightens the muscles in the chest and throat. Deep breathing, on the other hand, sends oxygen to the lungs and brain and expands the throat and chest, promoting relaxation. Before going joining the audience, use the deep breathing and as you approach the platform, take a deep breath and relax. Also, remember to breathe through your nose – mouth breathing will strain the muscles in your chest and throat.
  • Stay Hydrated: Dry mouth is common when people are nervous. Trying to speak with “cotton mouth” can be painful for you and your audience. Take a quick sip before going onstage and keep water nearby during your speech, just in case. Taking a drink of water during your presentation can also provide a pensive pause if you happen to lose your place or need a moment to regain your composure.
  • Release Excess Nervous Energy: Light physical exercise, walking, jogging in place for a second, or do a few dance steps; these are all good ways to deal with the jitters. If you are really nervous just before presenting, flex your calves or ball up your fists. All these physical releases can help you refocus your energy and not fidget in front of your audience.
  • Focus on Gratitude: Make a quick mental gratitude list to keep you focused on the positive while you are doing the deep breathing and grounding before speaking.
  • Visualize Success: Focus on your success and the outcome. Remember, you care about what you are saying, you have put in the time and effort and you will be fabulous!
  • Goal 20Review Your Key Points: Review your key points and focus on the core goals and reasons for your speaking that day.
  • Love Your Listeners: Thinking of your audience as hostile or as the enemy is negative thinking and will put you on the defensive. Come from the place of thinking “my audience is friendly”. Believe they are there because they are interested in what you have to say. You get back what you put out – and this adage is very apparent in public speaking. If you want your audiences to love you, love them first!
  • Show Confidence: The audience will never know if you are nervous or not. Never start your speech by admitting to the audience you are nervous as this puts them in the position of “taking care of you” and takes away from your status as a professional and an expert in your field.

Remember that everyone has some level of anxiety before speaking; even the top professional speakers have some nerves but they have mastered how to overcome the nerves and use them. Use the tips above to help you to relieve the anxiety and to be the speaker you want to be. Looking to master your speaking anxiety? Contact me today! Happy Speaking – You are Fabulous!

Guest Speaker Etiquette

At a national convention, I attended recently, I had the opportunity to observe closely two well-known speakers and their behavior over the weekend.

The first speaker:

Business woman checking inFrom the time she arrived to the time she left her behavior was courteous and gracious to everyone. From the hotel desk clerk to the CEO of a large corporation, the event coordinator, and everyone in between… all were treated with courtesy, even when things went wrong. Here are a few things that I knew about and observed:

  • Her luggage was late arriving
  • Her handout materials were delivered to the wrong event room
  • The speaker before her went way over the allocated time, so this speaker’s time was reduced by 10 minutes
  • The wireless microphone battery went dead during her speech
  • Someone knocked over a tray of water glasses just as she was making a key point

She handled all of these glitches with grace, poise, kindness, and courtesy; which left a lasting positive impression on me. After she spoke and the session ended, people flocked to her vendor table to speak to her and buy her products.

Angry Business ManThe second speaker:

At the same event there was also a good example of what not to do when invited to be a guest speaker. I also observed another well-known speaker scheduled for an afternoon session. Here are some things I observed:

    • He swore at the desk clerk because his room wasn’t ready when he arrived
    • He didn’t mingle with any of the other attendees
    • He showed up a few minutes before his presentation
    • He was curt and rude to the event coordinator before going on stage
    • When he got up to speak, he spent a few minutes bashing the venue and the coordinator before getting on with his presentation, which went over his allocated time slot by 15 minutes. (He ignored the event MC’s attempts to have him wrap up his talk)
    • After he spoke he was backstage spewing negative comments and a few obscenities about the event
    • When the session ended, he was at his vendor table where very few people approached and he made almost no sales
    • As he loaded up to leave the event a short time later, he was loudly complaining about his lack of sales

One thing I am sure of is that several other people were also observing these speakers behaviors and actions, and probably talked about the different impressions they each left on us. What impression do you want to make as a guest speaker? Some simple etiquette guidelines for a guest speaker. Some of these tips are also good for event and meeting planners to consider adding into a guest speaker contract too.

Star Maker Guest Speaker Etiquette Tips:

  • Be sure to give the event coordinator all your speaker info, headshot, talk information promptly and as far in advance as possible.
  • Show up for your speech at least 30 minutes early, allow extra time for traffic delays if needed.
  • Let the meeting planner or designated contact know when you arrive at the venue.
  • Contact the meeting planner immediately if you have any delays in getting to the venue.
  • Test the microphone and all equipment before the event starts and before you start speaking.
  • Take the time to know your audience before you speak.
  • Be respectful of the people who ask you to speak. Berating or blaming anyone for issues with equipment or other glitches at the event will not reflect well on you, the speaker.
  • As a guest speaker your behavior is being observed at all times, by many people and will be talked about, so be a positive influence, polite and respectful to everyone.
  • Never overindulge in drinking before, during or after speaking.
  • Keep your speech within the allotted time, no more, no less.
  • Be flexible with your speech based on how the schedule progresses; be prepared as you may need to cut back or add on as the event timing unfolds.
  • Give valuable information and don’t over promote your products from the platform.
  • Be a part of the event experience, instead of just delivering your speech and immediately leaving. Network, attend other sessions if it is a multi-session event, visit with people.

If you want to be invited back or booked as a speaker, make sure that on and off the stage you are setting the right tone. It’s too bad that the second speaker left a bad impression off stage. It is not good business or good manners, and those who are experienced in selecting guest speakers are looking for the speaker that brings the most overall value. Be the guest speaker that makes a great all-around impression. Find other suggestions on how to be a speaker HERE

Copyright© 2014 Elizabeth Bachman, San Francisco, California. All Rights Reserved.

Laptop and microphone

Is PowerPoint Making or Breaking Your Talk?

by Guest Blogger Lorrie Nicoles As a longLaptop and microphone-time writer and short-time business owner, writing a blog for Elizabeth Bachman, The Star Maker for Speakers, initially seemed odd. I mean, I’m a writer, not a speaker. And, while others see speaking in my future, it is not in the current plan. Just as many speakers would rather go mute than write, many writers would rather have their hands cut off than be on the stage. I’m pretty partial to my hands, but speaking is still not high on my Things To Do list. So, what do I have to offer speakers? How about what makes a good PowerPoint presentation? Technology can be so much fun, so having a presentation to accompany your talk can be very alluring. And, a good PowerPoint can really enhance a talk. BUT, a bad PowerPoint can make the best of talks a total disaster! Technical difficulties do not make a bad PowerPoint. They do, however, indicate an unprepared presenter – regardless of who’s actually responsible. Nope, a bad PowerPoint is:

  • Bland Looking
  • Over-full of Content
  • Too Glitzy

Bland

These days, it is actually pretty hard to find a truly bland PowerPoint. A slide with just a list of bullets devoid of color, graphics, or any sort of design is almost impossible, because PowerPoint generally doesn’t let people start from a purely blank slate. You have to work pretty hard to create one. However, starting with a basic template and presenting strictly bullet points becomes real boring real quick. Even for the technically klutzy, changing layouts, adding a picture, and playing with fonts and colors is simple enough. There is really no excuse for a presentation lacking in visual stimulation.

Over-Full

This is the one that really gets me. Why bother speaking if everything is on the slide? Too often I go to a talk and come away frustrated because either the slides distracted me from the speaker or the speaker distracted me from the slides. Content for a good slide is a maximum of seven bullet points.

  • Bullet Points: No full sentences, just something to jog the memory.
  • Maximum of 7 Points: And that is the ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM. If you hit 7 – including sub-bullets – you have run out of space on your slide.

When the entire talk is on the slide, you deprive the audience. Most likely, you will end up reading your talk, not giving it. You lose spontaneity; besides, the audience is too busy reading to pay attention to you, so why bother being spontaneous?

Glitzy

FireworksHow many presentations have you seen where there is so much design, graphics, and/or animation that you are just dumbfounded? Assuming the projector works, and your computer speaks to it without a problem, an over-done slide can lead to technical difficulties. We’ve all seen a mouse send a presentation in the wrong direction, skip a slide, or just not do anything. Imagine how much worse that looks when all the bling on the slide takes over your presentation. Use PowerPoint as a tool to enhance your talk, not as an opportunity to wow the audience with your awesome skill. You’re just as likely to look like an idiot as a master.

Random Tips

There are some basics to a presentation that I learned from doing, watching, and having a mom in marketing.

  1. Large Font: If the people at the back of the room can’t read it, then it is too small.
  2. Readable Font: I love playing with fonts, but there are really very few that I actually use. Remember, pretty does not equal readable.
  3. Mix Things Up: Change your slide layouts. Include pictures/graphics, but not on every slide. If you are up for it, throw in the occasional – and simple – animation.
  4. Good Design: Your color scheme must match your brand! If you are getting creative with bullets, make sure they are still clear. Keep the background noise to a minimum.

So, that’s what Tora Writing Services has to offer to Elizabeth Bachman’s speakers. At least for today. Maybe I’ll come up with something else in the future. Lorrie N About Lorrie Nicoles: Lorrie Nicoles is a Written Word Consultant & Content Editor and founder of Tora Writing Services. Lorrie loves words and crafting written messages. Her passion for Clear Communication led her through a short career as a Mine Planning Engineer, over a decade translating other engineers for the rest of the population through software documentation, and eventually starting her own business. As a person of many skills, talents, and personalities, Lorrie repeatedly proves that if she can understand a topic, she can write about it. She regularly credits the combination of growing up in “the Land of the Leftover Hippies” (the Rockridge Neighborhood of Oakland, CA), her marketing mom, forestry dad, and uber-organized banking step-mom with her ability to explain almost anything to almost anyone.

Woman speaker pointing at flip chart graph

Using Props When Speaking

Want tWoman speaker pointing at flip chart grapho enhance your public speaking? Using props can be very effective when done right, resulting in an enhanced presentation. The word “prop” is a shortened version from the term “theatrical property”, which refers to objects used by actors in a play, or in this case, a speaker telling a story to engage an audience. In my long history in both Opera and Theater, I have firsthand knowledge of the dos and don’ts of using props. Props have been used to enhance storytelling since the dawn of time. Props can be as simple as a chair, or picture, food, beverage, trophy or as intricate as a PowerPoint presentation, video,… you get the idea, right? Using items to enhance your speaking can be very beneficial by adding memorable visuals and moments, or it can backfire by distracting the audience or even offending the audience.

Props Can:

  • Laptop and microphoneMake a point concrete
  • Have an emotional impact
  • Focus the audience’s attention and interest
  • Be effective metaphors
  • Inject humor into a presentation
  • Be memorable
  • Be unexpected

My client Shannon talks about defeating one’s inner monsters, then hands out monster finger puppets to the crowd. It’s both humorous and memorable. Here are some of my expert tips on Dos and Don’ts of using props when speaking.

10 DOs for Using Props

Word Goal DO: Test Your Props and make sure they work Thoroughly test your prop before your presentation. It is the best way to ensure it works when under pressure in front of an audience. DO: Keep Props hidden until needed Visible props can distract an audience and spoil their effectiveness. Keep them hidden by a cover or behind a table or screen. DO: Have a backup in case the prop/PowerPoint doesn’t work Having a backup of any PowerPoint is a must. You should also have a backup plan in case the prop doesn’t work, disappears, or breaks. DO: Use props that are memorable Props are to enhance what you are speaking about. When your prop is memorable it will keep your key point in your audiences mind long after your presentation. DO: Make sure the prop is relevant (appropriate) for the topic It’s great to use a prop to emphasize a point, but don’t confuse the audience. If the prop is too unusual, the same color as your outfit, or relies on words that one can’t see from the back of the room, it will detract from your message. DO: Make sure everyone can see the prop clearly Have a prop that is large enough to be visible to everyone in the room. If you have a large audience, make sure there are screens where the picture of the item can be projected so everyone can see it. DO: Practice with the props several times – till you’re comfortable using them Practice, practice, practice! For a great presentation you will want to be able to use the prop smoothly and not fumble with it on stage. Props are there to enhance your message, not distract you with worry about how to make it function. DO: Be creative with your props Use an everyday item in an unusual way or something that would be unexpected. DO: Put the prop away so it doesn’t become a distraction Once you are done using a prop make sure it is out of sight or off to the side far enough not to be a distraction or a tripping hazard. DO: Have props available after the presentation for a closer look when appropriate Props that are products/items that are being sold should be available for the audience to look at after the presentation.

5 Don’ts for Using Props When Speaking:

man juggling itemsDon’t leave the prop where it will distract the audience or be in your way You want the audience’s attention to be on you, the speaker, not on the prop which has largely served its purpose. Leaving a prop in the way so your movements are hampered, or even worse, so you could trip over it, is a mistake that professional speakers don’t make. Don’t use a bunch of different props so you end up looking silly Using the right amount of props to emphasize a point is good, using too many props can make you look more like a juggler in a circus act than a professional speaker. Don’t use props that can hurt people Using items that can hurtle into an audience, hit someone or damage their clothing is a negative on many levels. Don’t use props that Offend or Outrage your audience Ask yourself if your prop is going to offend your audience or make them angry? If so, don’t use it. The last thing you want is a hostile audience. If you are unsure, ask a trusted speaking advisor. Don’t pass props around – it becomes a distraction during the presentation Passing around your props, products, brochures, handouts or other items after you start speaking can be very distracting, noisy and often times annoying to your audience. Using props to enhance your presentations is an excellent way to make your presentation unforgettable. Copyright© 2014 Elizabeth Bachman, San Francisco, California. All Rights Reserved.

Just the Facts Ma’am, Just the Facts – Part 2

Just the Facts Ma’am, Just the Facts – Part 2

As I mentioned in my previous blog, your listeners will relate more to stories than to a list of facts. But what if you are giving a report where the facts are important?
Use a metaphor!

Creative ThinkingStatistics are a great way to catch an audience’s attention. I often say “Speaking is one of THE best ways to promote your business or practice, yet 3 out of 4 people would rather DIE than speak in public.” That statistic makes people sit up. Then I follow up with a story, and I can see the comprehension in their eyes. When you need to explain something complicated – for instance, if you are giving a report to upper management – then using a metaphor will help the concept stick in their minds.

“Metaphors have a way of holding the most truth in the least space.” ― Orson Scott Card
Happy Speaking! You are FABULOUS!
Elizabeth

Have you listened in to one of our Master Mind calls for great ideas for speaking? Click here for more information about our next Master Mind Call!

Just the Facts Ma’am, Just the Facts

Accounting reportDo you use your own personal story to connect with your audience or do you get up and just give people the facts when you speak? If you feel like your audience is tuning out when you speak, it could be because you aren’t connecting with them on an emotional level, just giving them the facts. Everyone has a personal story that relates to their business in some way. Finding the connection to your story, your business and the emotional connection with your prospects is a key to having people lining up to work with you. Here are some tips from expert speakers about using stories when they speak:

  • Although facts are important, what people remember what they can relate to.
  • People want to know about you as a person before they want to do business with you.
  • Stories bring the facts to life.
  • People have emotional needs that facts don’t touch. Stories are the key to reaching their emotions.

Woman SpeakingHaving trouble figuring out what the connection is to your prospects emotional needs are and how to craft your story to bring emotional value to your prospects? We can craft your speech so you become a Star Speaker who reaches their prospects and turns them into clients.

Happy Speaking! You are FABULOUS!
Elizabeth

Copyright© 2014 Elizabeth Bachman, San Francisco, California. All Rights Reserved.

Plan

Presentation Skills – How to Write Your Speech

PlanStructuring your speech:

Start at the end. Decide what you are selling, and start your speech by crafting the offer. Then work backward. Set up your talk so that each point leads the listener towards your call to action.

What do you want your audience to do?

What problem do they have for which you offer the solution?

Give them 3-5 short tips during your speech, all of which will lead to the ultimate solution of working with you.

There are many possible formats for a speech.

One of the easiest is to use the 5-part rule.

  • Introduction
  • Point 1 – Medium
  • Point 2 – Least strong
  • Point 3 – Strongest
  • Conclusion (with a call to action)

When you decide what your three main points will be, choose the juiciest, most transformational tip as your third one. You want to have the audience be excited ready to buy as you move into your conclusion.

As I said at the beginning, start with your conclusion. Your entire speech should be aimed towards the conclusion and your sales offer. Even if you are doing a keynote with no sales attached, think of your major theme as the offer. Your summation will be what they remember.

This is an ongoing process, and it is very difficult to do this on your own. If you want information on how to set up your speech so that the audience is begging to work with you, contact me at: elizabeth@elizabethbachman.com

Copyright© 2014 Elizabeth Bachman, San Francisco, California. All Rights Reserved.