Woman Walking

Strategies to Manage Speaker Nerves

Woman Walking Mark Twain once said, “There are two kinds of speakers: those that are nervous and those that are liars.” No matter how seasoned or under-seasoned you are as a speaker, when it comes to making presentations, Mr. Twain assures us nerves are just part our reality. Whether you are speaking to two people at a networking event, or two thousand as a keynote speaker, here are three strategies to help you get out of your head and on to the stage confident, poised and powerful. 1. Exercise…according to research from Dartmouth’s Neurobiology of Learning and Memory Laboratory, “the positive stress of exercise prepares cells and structures pathways within the brain so that they’re more equipped to handle stress in other forms.” So rather than tweaking your script again, spend a half-hour going for a walk or doing some cardio and release some serotonin – also known as the happy hormones. 2. Give yourself a running start…memorize your first three lines. Many public speakers cite getting started as their biggest stumbling block. You can short circuit your monkey mind by committing your first three lines to memory and reprogram your jitters into excitement about participating in the day’s event. 3. Invite a dialogue instead of a monologue. Plan a presentation to engage with the audience on a particular topic rather than conducting a lecture where only the speaker’s opinion and contributions are relevant. Early in your talk, perhaps in the first minute, ask the audience a question that requires a response, or take an informal opinion poll and get some feedback. This type of audience engagement will allow them to better retain the information you share. It will also give you a chance to breathe, take a sip of water, and manage your stress level.

To Be Or Not To Be… Part 2

Imagine no limitations; decide what's right and desirable before you decide what's possible. Brian TracyTo be or not to be.

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Those six words question the balance between the state of being versus the state of not being. Do you want to live a life of balance? Are you truly alive, or are you settling for a day-to-day existence in which you are alive, but not living your passion? Hamlet wanted to avenge his father’s murder. He wanted to set his world right, which his father’s violent end had thrown off kilter. Yet he didn’t go charging off in cartoon-hero fashion. Hamlet had very human generic for sale concerns about “the rub”: the difficulties, the objections, and the obstacles. It wasn’t until he faced his doubts and moved ahead anyway that he was able to create change. As a speaker

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who wishes to have an impact on your audience, you are no different. You must overcome your own doubts, demons and nagging fears. “What if the audience doesn’t like what I have to say? What if I forget my talk? What if…?” Like Hamlet, you have a choice. You can choose…to use your voice to make a difference dosage vs in the world. You can choose…to influence and empower others with inspiration custom care and imagination to make changes in their lives. You can choose…to

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be a confident, articulate, compassionate speaker who chooses “To Be!” If you are ready to learn how to give voice to your passions and gifts contact fda Elizabeth Bachman at ElizabethBachman.com

Wake up!

My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style. Maya AngelouYour priceless legacy… Let’s talk about your legacy. What do you believe? What do you stand for? How do you want to be remembered? As a speaker, you have the chance to decide how you want to be remembered. You can decide how to create an impression, or build on an impression you have already made on an audience. Claim your legacy with renewed vision and spirit. Starting right now, you have the opportunity to create the person you have always wanted to be. Beginning immediately, you can shine brightly generic uk sales for the world to see. It may not be easy. You have many old, comfortable behaviors, which will create predictable outcomes for most events. Wake up! Did you just hear me? You cannot leave a priceless legacy if you are not living your own life, being authentic in your message and letting your voice be heard. As Ghandi said, “My life is my message.” It’s time to show up as a speaker and to live your vision…share your -best life and your message. Your people are waiting for you!

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If you are ready to learn how to give voice to your story and legacy contact Elizabeth Bachman at ElizabethBachman.com

Good Health Is Good for Your Speaking Business…Meditate to Manage Stress

Meditation pose 1Stress is a major cause of energy loss. Between 50 and 70 million Americans have a difficult time sleeping well, and stress is a large part of the problem. While some would say speaking in public is a cause of stress for them, you know that speaking is one of the best ways to promote your business or practice and stress is part of life. Meditation pose 2We can’t take our minds off that troublesome relationship, our financial woes, a problem that we are trying to solve or a strategy to meet all of the demands placed upon us. For millennia, people have found relief from stress through meditation. Regular meditation fills you with a sense of peace that stays with you long after your meditation ends. You don’t need to be a yogi to meditate. Here are three quick ways to add meditation to your day.

  1. Stop what you are doing and focus on your breathing. Just follow your breath in and out. If thoughts intrude, let them go and return to following your breath. Five minutes of this will calm you.
  2. Close your eyes and imagine yourself in a place that represents peace and calm to you. It could be lying on a beach, strolling along a path under the trees, or holding hands with a loved one. Put yourself in the scene in your imagination. Experience it fully, as if you were there. Do this for five minutes, and you will feel refreshed and peaceful.
  3. Choose a word that has meaning for you, such as “peace,” “calm,” “love.”  Repeat it slowly to yourself for several minutes, concentrating on the feeling it creates in you. You will carry the feeling with you long after your meditation ends.

For best results, try to meditate in a quiet place where you will not be interrupted. Meditation doesn’t have to take a lot of time. You can do it at your desk while riding public transportation, or when sitting in your living room during a commercial break on television. The key to success is to just do it.

Good Health Is Good for Your Speaking Business…Stay Hydrated

Water dropsThe human body is made primarily of water. Maintaining that water balance is critically important especially since the body loses water every day through breathing, sweating and urination. The water content in the foods you eat and the beverages you drink combine to hydrate your body. If you lose more water than you replace, you overheat and become dehydrated, which is a common cause of fatigue. Your brain requires proper hydration to function optimally. The kidneys need water to function and remove waste products. Water lubricates your muscles and joints and helps maintain optimal function. When you don’t drink enough water to stay properly hydrated, your heart has to work harder to keep up blood flow, and you experience dizziness, fatigue, mental fogginess, impaired short-term memory. If not remedied, you might faint or become disoriented. Severe dehydration is a serious medical condition. Woman drinking water 2Speakers are often offered a glass of water as they are preparing to speak. Although this may help you swallow or temporarily relieve a dry mouth, it is not the most important water you could drink if you want to deliver your talk with ease. It’s the water you drink several hours before you speak. The water has to go through the digestive system to be distributed to the mucosal cells in the throat. This determines if the mucous is thick or runny. You want runny. Do you ever struggle to clear your throat or hear strange sounds and voice irregularities as you speak? To drink plenty of water several hours before you speak and you will enjoy clear and easy voice production. The goal is to drink 64 ounces of water daily. That’s about eight 8-ounce glasses. You can reach that objective and stay hydrated by drinking a glass of water every couple of hours.

What to Wear When Speaking

Stage and stairsAs a speaker you are the center of everyone’s attention. From the moment you arrive at the event you are on public display. You only have a few seconds to make a positive first impression, both by how you look and by how you conduct yourself.  Despite all the talk about not judging people by their appearance… well, people do judge.

When you, as a star speaker appear at an event you want to brand yourself as a professional, someone who is knowledgeable about the subject and about being a speaker.

The experienced speaker knows that 93% of what people perceive about you comes from your non-verbal communications.  A star speaker prepares and does their homework on what to wear to make the best impression.  (A 3-piece suit is not always the answer.)

Rule of Thumb:  Dress the way the audience does — one notch better.

In preparing to speak at a venue there is some key information you will want to gather before deciding what to wear.

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Speakers Tell Stories like an Artist Painting a Canvas

Artist painting canvasGreat speakers are the ones that are also great storytellers. All great storytellers are also great artists when it comes to their craft. Storytellers, like artists, are painting pictures with words instead of paint for their audiences. The storyteller starts with a blank canvas and starts painting with their words so the audience “sees” in their mind’s eye what the speaker is telling them. At the conclusion of the story, the listeners will have the whole “picture” from the speaker. Great stories will affect the listeners in a variety of ways; intellectually, emotionally and even physically. Finding the keys to the listeners’ minds and hearts is the first step in creating a memorable speech. As the speaker paints the words on the minds and hearts of their audience they are connecting with the listeners on a variety of levels. Professional speakers know that laying the groundwork for their speech is crucial to getting their point across. They will sometimes spend hours doing research and tweaking their stories and speech to create just the right picture for their listeners. These speakers know the steps leading up to a stellar ending. Starting with the end in mind and crafting the speech to cover the storytelling basics, speakers follow a general pattern that they use over and over again, with minor variations.

Star Maker Speaker Steps to Crafting a Story:

  1. Steps up businessStart with the background
  2. Rough in the outline
  3. Add color and interest
  4. Have a few surprises
  5. Use contrast
  6. Fill in the details
  7. Have a strong conclusion

Using the above steps, review all of your stories that you use for your speeches to see if they follow these steps. Do your stories meet these artistic criteria, touching your listeners mentally and emotionally? If you aren’t sure if your storytelling is touching all the points, ask some trusted friends who have heard you speak for feedback. When you aren’t getting the results you want from your speaking, it may be time to seek some assistance. Need some assistance taking your speaking and storytelling skills to the next level? Book a Strategy Session.

Guest Speaker Etiquette

At a national convention, I attended recently, I had the opportunity to observe closely two well-known speakers and their behavior over the weekend.

The first speaker:

Business woman checking inFrom the time she arrived to the time she left her behavior was courteous and gracious to everyone. From the hotel desk clerk to the CEO of a large corporation, the event coordinator, and everyone in between… all were treated with courtesy, even when things went wrong. Here are a few things that I knew about and observed:

  • Her luggage was late arriving
  • Her handout materials were delivered to the wrong event room
  • The speaker before her went way over the allocated time, so this speaker’s time was reduced by 10 minutes
  • The wireless microphone battery went dead during her speech
  • Someone knocked over a tray of water glasses just as she was making a key point

She handled all of these glitches with grace, poise, kindness, and courtesy; which left a lasting positive impression on me. After she spoke and the session ended, people flocked to her vendor table to speak to her and buy her products.

Angry Business ManThe second speaker:

At the same event there was also a good example of what not to do when invited to be a guest speaker. I also observed another well-known speaker scheduled for an afternoon session. Here are some things I observed:

    • He swore at the desk clerk because his room wasn’t ready when he arrived
    • He didn’t mingle with any of the other attendees
    • He showed up a few minutes before his presentation
    • He was curt and rude to the event coordinator before going on stage
    • When he got up to speak, he spent a few minutes bashing the venue and the coordinator before getting on with his presentation, which went over his allocated time slot by 15 minutes. (He ignored the event MC’s attempts to have him wrap up his talk)
    • After he spoke he was backstage spewing negative comments and a few obscenities about the event
    • When the session ended, he was at his vendor table where very few people approached and he made almost no sales
    • As he loaded up to leave the event a short time later, he was loudly complaining about his lack of sales

One thing I am sure of is that several other people were also observing these speakers behaviors and actions, and probably talked about the different impressions they each left on us. What impression do you want to make as a guest speaker? Some simple etiquette guidelines for a guest speaker. Some of these tips are also good for event and meeting planners to consider adding into a guest speaker contract too.

Star Maker Guest Speaker Etiquette Tips:

  • Be sure to give the event coordinator all your speaker info, headshot, talk information promptly and as far in advance as possible.
  • Show up for your speech at least 30 minutes early, allow extra time for traffic delays if needed.
  • Let the meeting planner or designated contact know when you arrive at the venue.
  • Contact the meeting planner immediately if you have any delays in getting to the venue.
  • Test the microphone and all equipment before the event starts and before you start speaking.
  • Take the time to know your audience before you speak.
  • Be respectful of the people who ask you to speak. Berating or blaming anyone for issues with equipment or other glitches at the event will not reflect well on you, the speaker.
  • As a guest speaker your behavior is being observed at all times, by many people and will be talked about, so be a positive influence, polite and respectful to everyone.
  • Never overindulge in drinking before, during or after speaking.
  • Keep your speech within the allotted time, no more, no less.
  • Be flexible with your speech based on how the schedule progresses; be prepared as you may need to cut back or add on as the event timing unfolds.
  • Give valuable information and don’t over promote your products from the platform.
  • Be a part of the event experience, instead of just delivering your speech and immediately leaving. Network, attend other sessions if it is a multi-session event, visit with people.

If you want to be invited back or booked as a speaker, make sure that on and off the stage you are setting the right tone. It’s too bad that the second speaker left a bad impression off stage. It is not good business or good manners, and those who are experienced in selecting guest speakers are looking for the speaker that brings the most overall value. Be the guest speaker that makes a great all-around impression. Find other suggestions on how to be a speaker HERE

Copyright© 2014 Elizabeth Bachman, San Francisco, California. All Rights Reserved.

Laptop and microphone

Is PowerPoint Making or Breaking Your Talk?

by Guest Blogger Lorrie Nicoles As a longLaptop and microphone-time writer and short-time business owner, writing a blog for Elizabeth Bachman, The Star Maker for Speakers, initially seemed odd. I mean, I’m a writer, not a speaker. And, while others see speaking in my future, it is not in the current plan. Just as many speakers would rather go mute than write, many writers would rather have their hands cut off than be on the stage. I’m pretty partial to my hands, but speaking is still not high on my Things To Do list. So, what do I have to offer speakers? How about what makes a good PowerPoint presentation? Technology can be so much fun, so having a presentation to accompany your talk can be very alluring. And, a good PowerPoint can really enhance a talk. BUT, a bad PowerPoint can make the best of talks a total disaster! Technical difficulties do not make a bad PowerPoint. They do, however, indicate an unprepared presenter – regardless of who’s actually responsible. Nope, a bad PowerPoint is:

  • Bland Looking
  • Over-full of Content
  • Too Glitzy

Bland

These days, it is actually pretty hard to find a truly bland PowerPoint. A slide with just a list of bullets devoid of color, graphics, or any sort of design is almost impossible, because PowerPoint generally doesn’t let people start from a purely blank slate. You have to work pretty hard to create one. However, starting with a basic template and presenting strictly bullet points becomes real boring real quick. Even for the technically klutzy, changing layouts, adding a picture, and playing with fonts and colors is simple enough. There is really no excuse for a presentation lacking in visual stimulation.

Over-Full

This is the one that really gets me. Why bother speaking if everything is on the slide? Too often I go to a talk and come away frustrated because either the slides distracted me from the speaker or the speaker distracted me from the slides. Content for a good slide is a maximum of seven bullet points.

  • Bullet Points: No full sentences, just something to jog the memory.
  • Maximum of 7 Points: And that is the ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM. If you hit 7 – including sub-bullets – you have run out of space on your slide.

When the entire talk is on the slide, you deprive the audience. Most likely, you will end up reading your talk, not giving it. You lose spontaneity; besides, the audience is too busy reading to pay attention to you, so why bother being spontaneous?

Glitzy

FireworksHow many presentations have you seen where there is so much design, graphics, and/or animation that you are just dumbfounded? Assuming the projector works, and your computer speaks to it without a problem, an over-done slide can lead to technical difficulties. We’ve all seen a mouse send a presentation in the wrong direction, skip a slide, or just not do anything. Imagine how much worse that looks when all the bling on the slide takes over your presentation. Use PowerPoint as a tool to enhance your talk, not as an opportunity to wow the audience with your awesome skill. You’re just as likely to look like an idiot as a master.

Random Tips

There are some basics to a presentation that I learned from doing, watching, and having a mom in marketing.

  1. Large Font: If the people at the back of the room can’t read it, then it is too small.
  2. Readable Font: I love playing with fonts, but there are really very few that I actually use. Remember, pretty does not equal readable.
  3. Mix Things Up: Change your slide layouts. Include pictures/graphics, but not on every slide. If you are up for it, throw in the occasional – and simple – animation.
  4. Good Design: Your color scheme must match your brand! If you are getting creative with bullets, make sure they are still clear. Keep the background noise to a minimum.

So, that’s what Tora Writing Services has to offer to Elizabeth Bachman’s speakers. At least for today. Maybe I’ll come up with something else in the future. Lorrie N About Lorrie Nicoles: Lorrie Nicoles is a Written Word Consultant & Content Editor and founder of Tora Writing Services. Lorrie loves words and crafting written messages. Her passion for Clear Communication led her through a short career as a Mine Planning Engineer, over a decade translating other engineers for the rest of the population through software documentation, and eventually starting her own business. As a person of many skills, talents, and personalities, Lorrie repeatedly proves that if she can understand a topic, she can write about it. She regularly credits the combination of growing up in “the Land of the Leftover Hippies” (the Rockridge Neighborhood of Oakland, CA), her marketing mom, forestry dad, and uber-organized banking step-mom with her ability to explain almost anything to almost anyone.

Woman speaker pointing at flip chart graph

Using Props When Speaking

Want tWoman speaker pointing at flip chart grapho enhance your public speaking? Using props can be very effective when done right, resulting in an enhanced presentation. The word “prop” is a shortened version from the term “theatrical property”, which refers to objects used by actors in a play, or in this case, a speaker telling a story to engage an audience. In my long history in both Opera and Theater, I have firsthand knowledge of the dos and don’ts of using props. Props have been used to enhance storytelling since the dawn of time. Props can be as simple as a chair, or picture, food, beverage, trophy or as intricate as a PowerPoint presentation, video,… you get the idea, right? Using items to enhance your speaking can be very beneficial by adding memorable visuals and moments, or it can backfire by distracting the audience or even offending the audience.

Props Can:

  • Laptop and microphoneMake a point concrete
  • Have an emotional impact
  • Focus the audience’s attention and interest
  • Be effective metaphors
  • Inject humor into a presentation
  • Be memorable
  • Be unexpected

My client Shannon talks about defeating one’s inner monsters, then hands out monster finger puppets to the crowd. It’s both humorous and memorable. Here are some of my expert tips on Dos and Don’ts of using props when speaking.

10 DOs for Using Props

Word Goal DO: Test Your Props and make sure they work Thoroughly test your prop before your presentation. It is the best way to ensure it works when under pressure in front of an audience. DO: Keep Props hidden until needed Visible props can distract an audience and spoil their effectiveness. Keep them hidden by a cover or behind a table or screen. DO: Have a backup in case the prop/PowerPoint doesn’t work Having a backup of any PowerPoint is a must. You should also have a backup plan in case the prop doesn’t work, disappears, or breaks. DO: Use props that are memorable Props are to enhance what you are speaking about. When your prop is memorable it will keep your key point in your audiences mind long after your presentation. DO: Make sure the prop is relevant (appropriate) for the topic It’s great to use a prop to emphasize a point, but don’t confuse the audience. If the prop is too unusual, the same color as your outfit, or relies on words that one can’t see from the back of the room, it will detract from your message. DO: Make sure everyone can see the prop clearly Have a prop that is large enough to be visible to everyone in the room. If you have a large audience, make sure there are screens where the picture of the item can be projected so everyone can see it. DO: Practice with the props several times – till you’re comfortable using them Practice, practice, practice! For a great presentation you will want to be able to use the prop smoothly and not fumble with it on stage. Props are there to enhance your message, not distract you with worry about how to make it function. DO: Be creative with your props Use an everyday item in an unusual way or something that would be unexpected. DO: Put the prop away so it doesn’t become a distraction Once you are done using a prop make sure it is out of sight or off to the side far enough not to be a distraction or a tripping hazard. DO: Have props available after the presentation for a closer look when appropriate Props that are products/items that are being sold should be available for the audience to look at after the presentation.

5 Don’ts for Using Props When Speaking:

man juggling itemsDon’t leave the prop where it will distract the audience or be in your way You want the audience’s attention to be on you, the speaker, not on the prop which has largely served its purpose. Leaving a prop in the way so your movements are hampered, or even worse, so you could trip over it, is a mistake that professional speakers don’t make. Don’t use a bunch of different props so you end up looking silly Using the right amount of props to emphasize a point is good, using too many props can make you look more like a juggler in a circus act than a professional speaker. Don’t use props that can hurt people Using items that can hurtle into an audience, hit someone or damage their clothing is a negative on many levels. Don’t use props that Offend or Outrage your audience Ask yourself if your prop is going to offend your audience or make them angry? If so, don’t use it. The last thing you want is a hostile audience. If you are unsure, ask a trusted speaking advisor. Don’t pass props around – it becomes a distraction during the presentation Passing around your props, products, brochures, handouts or other items after you start speaking can be very distracting, noisy and often times annoying to your audience. Using props to enhance your presentations is an excellent way to make your presentation unforgettable. Copyright© 2014 Elizabeth Bachman, San Francisco, California. All Rights Reserved.